Vision

Showing comments and forms 1 to 16 of 16

Support

Preferred Site Allocations 2018

Representation ID: 17940

Received: 15/02/2018

Respondent: Chris Wain

Representation:

The idea of Brentwood as a borough of villages and protecting the green belt is essential

Full text:

The idea of Brentwood as a borough of villages and protecting the green belt is essential

Comment

Preferred Site Allocations 2018

Representation ID: 17948

Received: 21/02/2018

Respondent: Essex Bridleways Association

Representation:

SO17: We would prefer to see the aspiration of access for all within such green infrastructure embedded within the Plan's Strategic Objectives and suggest this objective is worded thus: 'Establish a rich connected network of accessible Green Infrastructure across the Borough...'

SO22: Access for all should be emphasised in the Plan as at present only walking and cycling are catered for. For the Plan to be fully inclusive, we suggest this objective is reworded thus: 'improve cycling, walking and horse riding facilities across the Borough and establish a network of green transport corridors, accessible to all vulnerable user groups...'

Full text:

SO17: We would prefer to see the aspiration of access for all within such green infrastructure embedded within the Plan's Strategic Objectives and suggest this objective is worded thus: 'Establish a rich connected network of accessible Green Infrastructure across the Borough...'

SO22: Access for all should be emphasised in the Plan as at present only walking and cycling are catered for. For the Plan to be fully inclusive, we suggest this objective is reworded thus: 'improve cycling, walking and horse riding facilities across the Borough and establish a network of green transport corridors, accessible to all vulnerable user groups...'

Comment

Preferred Site Allocations 2018

Representation ID: 17949

Received: 21/02/2018

Respondent: Essex Bridleways Association

Representation:

Include access for all within the Vision for the Plan

Full text:

Page 11 Vision: again, we welcome the emphasis on enhancing the natural assets of the Borough but are disappointed to note that access is intended to be limited to walking and cycling. This discriminates against other user groups - for example equestrians and the disabled, and we feel sure that it would not be the intention of the Council to exclude certain user groups within its overall Vision for the Plan period. We therefore suggest that this paragraph is reworded thus: '...The Borough will continue to thrive with a high-quality network of green infrastructure, parks and new connected green corridors, providing access opportunities for all users...'

Comment

Preferred Site Allocations 2018

Representation ID: 18061

Received: 06/03/2018

Respondent: Jamie Bottono

Representation:

How is all this growth being funded? What and how are priorities being set? You mention Crossrail but this is just the existing line being taken over and the cramped trains will remain. How can they cope with more users?

Full text:

How is all this growth being funded? What and how are priorities being set? You mention Crossrail but this is just the existing line being taken over and the cramped trains will remain. How can they cope with more users?

Comment

Preferred Site Allocations 2018

Representation ID: 18087

Received: 07/03/2018

Respondent: Mrs Susan Kortlandt

Representation:

It sounds fine. Who could object. The problem is that young people brought up in Brentwood can no longer afford to live here. The majority of people living in Brentwood work elsewhere and workers live in cheaper towns. We need affordable housing for Brentwood youngsters.

Full text:

It sounds fine. Who could object. The problem is that young people brought up in Brentwood can no longer afford to live here. The majority of people living in Brentwood work elsewhere and workers live in cheaper towns. We need affordable housing for Brentwood youngsters.

Object

Preferred Site Allocations 2018

Representation ID: 18096

Received: 08/03/2018

Respondent: Mr Gordon Bird

Representation:

Concerned that the statement 'We are committed to enabling new growth' subordinates the need for improving the quality of life for residents and the working population. It will result in a poorer place to live and work

Full text:

Concerned that the statement 'We are committed to enabling new growth' subordinates the need for improving the quality of life for residents and the working population. It will result in a poorer place to live and work

Object

Preferred Site Allocations 2018

Representation ID: 18144

Received: 10/03/2018

Respondent: Dr Philip Gibbs

Representation:

You talk of green corridors but my understanding is that the idea of a green buffer on the Brentwood side of the border with Basildon at Dunton Hills has been dropped. This is unacceptable harm to the environment imposed on the people and wildlife on Dunton Village

Full text:

You talk of green corridors but my understanding is that the idea of a green buffer on the Brentwood side of the border with Basildon at Dunton Hills has been dropped. This is unacceptable harm to the environment imposed on the people and wildlife on Dunton Village

Support

Preferred Site Allocations 2018

Representation ID: 18230

Received: 12/03/2018

Respondent: Uttlesford District Council

Representation:

UDC agrees with and supports the vision and supporting paragraphs (26 and 27) which sets out that Brentwood are "committed to enabling new growth in the borough that meets our development needs, but in a way that maintains and enhances our unique local character".

UDC supports Brentwood's position of meeting its housing needs within the district, and its consideration of how to continue to do so if housing requirements are increased.

Full text:

UDC agrees with and supports the vision and supporting paragraphs (26 and 27) which sets out that Brentwood are "committed to enabling new growth in the borough that meets our development needs, but in a way that maintains and enhances our unique local character".

UDC supports Brentwood's position of meeting its housing needs within the district, and its consideration of how to continue to do so if housing requirements are increased.

Attachments:

Support

Preferred Site Allocations 2018

Representation ID: 18247

Received: 12/03/2018

Respondent: CODE Development Planners Ltd

Agent: CODE Development Planners Ltd

Representation:

The Vision contains a clear understanding of the characteristics of the borough and forms the basis against which the policies and preferred allocations can be assessed.

Full text:

The vision for Brentwood borough contains a clear understanding of the characteristics of the borough which are worthy of protection and enhancement while at the same time recognizing the need for new development designed to encourage future investment and meet the housing needs for current and future generations.
It is important to firstly recognize and secondly ensure that new development complements the borough's character as a 'borough of villages' set within a high-quality network of green infrastructure, parks and connected green corridors. A clear vision of this kind is enabling the local plan process to assess the development options and all reasonable alternatives against their ability to deliver the vision.
See additional evidence.

Comment

Preferred Site Allocations 2018

Representation ID: 18260

Received: 12/03/2018

Respondent: Essex County Council

Representation:

ECC welcomes the inclusion of a clear and concise vision for the Draft Local Plan, but recommends that reference to health and wellbeing, and the encouragement of healthy active lifestyles should also be included.

Full text:

ECC welcomes the inclusion of a clear and concise vision for the Draft Local Plan, but recommends that reference to health and wellbeing, and the encouragement of healthy active lifestyles should also be included.

Support

Preferred Site Allocations 2018

Representation ID: 18268

Received: 12/03/2018

Respondent: Hermes Investment Management

Agent: McGough Planning Consultants

Representation:

Hermes Investment Management strongly supports the Council's vision, particularly in relation to the redevelopment of the sites at West Horndon Industrial Estate, and the new employment opportunity on land south of East Horndon Hall.

Full text:

Hermes Investment Management strongly supports the Council's vision, particularly in relation to the redevelopment of the sites at West Horndon Industrial Estate, and the new employment opportunity on land south of East Horndon Hall.

Comment

Preferred Site Allocations 2018

Representation ID: 18706

Received: 05/03/2018

Respondent: Mr Darren Williams

Representation:

Section 26 - "Committed to growth . . ." but in a way that maintains and enhances unique local character - whereas DHGV will completely destroy the unique local character of Dunton Village which is right on its border.

Full text:

Section 12 - Dunton Hills Garden Village (DHGV) "evidence base is increasing including masterplan work" and
Section 64 e - "Developing a comprehensive masterplan for the new garden village at Dunton Hills, to engrain the core garden village design principles"
* how can an objective view be made on site selection before this masterplan detail is presented and made available to the public?

Section 26 - "Commited to growth . . . but in a way that maintains and enhances unique local character"
* wheras DHGV will completely destroy the unique local character of Dunton Village which is right on its border.

Section 28 - Strategic Objectives - S04 "A new well connected community at Dunton Hills"
* Please see fuller comments below - but how can it be well connected when it isolated from the rest of Brentwood, isolated from the railway and bound by already heavily congested roads

Figure 9 - page 26/27 - Proposed Housing Led Allocations
* DHGV is not included in the Green Belt total, effectively masking the extent of Green Belt land being developed
* Out of 381.25 Hectares of land allocated, 342.65 (257 + 85.65) is green belt. That's a staggering 89.8% Green belt land, which does not deliver a sustainable, ecological allocation plan.

Section 67 - Total dwellings
* Figure 9 shows a total allocated dwelling number of 6,154 houses. DHGV makes up 40% of this total. However, section 67 states this figure could increase to 9080 with accelerated growth within DHGV to deliver 3500 dwellings.
* This will add a huge burden to the surrounding infrastructure. With an estimated 9000 residents (section 105), a large level of investment will need to be made regarding roads, health, schools, shopping and work provisions. A sticking plaster approach will just not work given that many of these areas are already stretched to within breaking point.
* It just seems that not enough effort has been put into dispersing these houses across the borough. It is just lazy of the council to allocate it 1) on green belt land and 2) land from a single land owner - just to make the allocation process easier

Figure 13 - page 33 - Provision of traveller sites
* Travellers do not contribute funding in the same way that the general public do through council tax, national insurance etc. and therefore it does not seem appropriate to creating infrastructure specifically for one minority group
* That said, if traveller provisions do need to be created, surely it is better for all concerned to allocate them away from large communities and therefore the 30 allocations at DHGV would seem wholly inappropriate in that regard

Figure 22 - page 57 - New Employment Site Allocations
* The largest proportion of new employment areas are extensions onto green belt land - again along the A127 corridor, further burdening the already gridlocked roadways. The A127 is already experiencing pollution levels above EU allowable levels.
* The erosion of Greenbelt along the A127 means that there is almost no division from the urban sprawl of London and Brentwood / Basildon meaning that there will no longer be any green belt

Attachments:

Object

Preferred Site Allocations 2018

Representation ID: 18946

Received: 12/03/2018

Respondent: Mr Francis Lai

Representation:

The Priest Lane site is the ONLY greenfield site in the plan.

Full text:

I object to the proposed housing development on sites 044 & 178 at Priests Lane for the following reasons: Page 6 Para 14: In arriving at a list of preferred site allocations, we have developed a site assessment process. This is robust, balanced and wide-ranging in terms of technical evidence material for each allocated and discounted site. Comment: there seems to be no concrete technical evidence to support Priest Lane as a preferred site. Page 11: 'The Borough will continue to thrive with a high-quality network of green infrastructure, parks and new connected green corridors, providing cycling and walking opportunities for all.' Comment: Priest Lane is really quite a narrow road with narrow pavements. It is already quite challenging to cyclers and motorists particularly during peak hours. With the additional homes to be built in Priest Lane site, resulting in additional cars using Priest Lane, it will be even more difficult to cycle safely. 'Brentwood will grow sustainably with new development directed to urban brownfield opportunity sites, well planned urban extensions and key transport corridors. Comment: The Priest Lane site is the ONLY greenfield site in the plan

Object

Preferred Site Allocations 2018

Representation ID: 19645

Received: 12/03/2018

Respondent: JTS Partnership LLP

Representation:

Whilst the Council's vision for the Borough is generally supported, the evidence base does not yet support the conclusion that the Dunton Hills Garden Village is the most sustainable way of meeting the development needs of the Borough up to 2033 (and beyond). It is particularly noted that the 'Garden Village' strategy scores poorly in respect of a number of topics, and objectives, as set out in the Interim Sustainability Appraisal Report

Full text:

INTRODUCTION: Paras 1 To 9. Object In November 2017, the Department for Communities and Local Government wrote to the Council expressing its concern about the lack of progress being made towards the adoption of a 2004 Act Local Plan, and putting it on notice that the Borough was on a short list of councils where Government intervention, in the local plan, process was being considered. Whilst there is an imperative on the Council to progress, and adopt, a new Local Plan as quickly as is practicably possible - and the publication of the Preferred Site Allocations document is, therefore, welcomed - a general concern has to be raised that, in its attempt to progress matters as quickly as possible, much of the evidence base, upon which the spatial strategy and individual site allocations are based, are still a 'work in progress' and have yet to be made public, in anything but a draft summary form. In this respect, it is particularly noted that: The Housing and Economic Land Availability Assessment (HELAA) has yet to be published. The Site Assessment Methodology and Summary of Outcomes (SAMSO) January 2018 document remains a 'working draft', with only a brief summary, as to the reasons why potential sites have been rejected, having been published (there is no detailed breakdown or analysis available setting out how sites have been scored / ranked in accordance with the assessment criteria). The Green Belt study, which should underpin and inform all potential Green Belt releases, has not yet been completed, with 'working drafts' only currently being available in respect of Part 1 and 2 assessments. The important Part 3 and 4 assessments (individual sites and review of Green Belt boundaries) do not appear to have been commenced. In the absence of key 'evidence base' documents, it is difficult to comment on the merits, or otherwise, of any of the proposed site allocations. It is also difficult to make a comparison between the respective merits of sites rejected by the Council and those put forward in the Preferred Site Allocations document. This is a fundamental weakness in the Council's approach and the publication of the Preferred Site Allocations document is premature until more progress has been made in respect of the underlying evidence base. As a result, a general objection has to be made to the timing, and content, of the Preferred Site Allocations document and, in particular, to all proposed Green Belt releases. Whilst it is undoubtedly the case that significant Green Belt land will need to be released, in order to meet the development needs of the Borough up to 2033, the Council is not yet in a position to make a meaningful comparative assessment of the merits, or otherwise, of potential Green Belt sites.PART 1: VISION - Paras 26 and 27. Object Whilst the Council's vision for the Borough is generally supported, the evidence base (for the reasons identified above) does not yet support the conclusion that the Dunton Hills Garden Village is the most sustainable way of meeting the development needs of the Borough up to 2033 (and beyond). It is particularly noted that the 'Garden Village' strategy scores poorly in respect of a General Support The Council's decision to revise housing need, from 362 dwellings per annum to 380 dwellings per annum, is consistent with the latest population data and best practice guidance and is generally welcomed. This section of the document does not, however, explain how the Borough Council has, either explicitly or implicitly, taken into account the requirements of Paragraph 47 of the NPPF (e.g. the 5% and 20% buffers). Whilst Paragraph 43 notes the DCLG's recent consultation on producing a standardised methodology for calculating local housing need (a matter which is also set out in the recent consultation on proposed changes to the NPPF), which could increase Brentwood's need to 455 dwellings per annum, or by 1,480 units over the Plan Period, the proposed way of dealing with this (bringing forward the development of Dunton Hills Garden Village earlier in the local plan period, is not considered adequate. The Borough Council either needs to commit to allocating additional sites (in this emerging Local Plan) or to undertaking an early review (immediately after the Plan has been adopted). PART 1: HOUSING SUPPLY - Paras 51 to 56 and Figure 7. General Comment Paragraph 55 notes that the Council received a number of representations, in relation to the 2016 Draft Local Plan, to the effect that there was a lack of information about the site assessment methodology and overall SHLAA / HELAA. As identified above, this situation has not changed, such that it is not possible, on the basis of the information published on the Council's website, to make a meaningful assessment of the merits of the proposed site allocations or the sites which have been rejected by the Council. PART 1: SUMMARY OF PROPOSED HOUSING LED ALLOCATIONS - Paragraphs 57 to 68 and Figure 8. Object Again, the main criticism of this part of the Preferred Site Allocations document, relates to the lack of information, in the evidence base, to support the various figures, and assumptions, set out therein. In particular, there is little information to back up the figures for 'completions', 'extant permissions', 'forecasts forward' and 'windfalls' as set out in Figure 8 - Housing Growth. PART 1: SETTLEMENT HIERARCHY AND ACCOMMODATING GROWTH - Paragraph 75 and Figure 14. Support The proposed settlement hierarchy and, in particular, the classification of Doddinghurst and Kelvedon Hatch as Large Villages / Village Service Centres is supported. For the reasons set out above, however, the position regarding Dunton Hills and West Thorndon has to be reserved although, it is accepted, that if these sites do come forward, as strategic allocations, then they should be Village Service Centres. PART 1: INFRASTRUCTURE PLANNING - Para 76. Support The need to plan for the level of infrastructure, needed to support housing and economic growth, is fully supported. PART 2: HOUSING SITES Object The Council's 'sequential approach' to the identification of housing sites is, for the reasons set out above, generally supported, as is the identification of those sites, as set out in Figure 9: Proposed Housing-Led Allocations, which fall within the following categories:- 1. 'Brownfield' land. 2. 'Greenfield' land within the Brentwood Urban Area and other Settlement Boundaries. However, and because of the paucity of the evidence base, and the fact that work on the HELAA and Green Belt Study (Parts 3 and 4) is still ongoing, it is difficult to make an assessment as to the merits of the proposed Green Belt releases and / or the comparative merits of the sites which the Borough Council has discounted. Whilst the 'sequential approach' to the release of Green Belt sites is supported, a holding objection has to be made to those allocations falling within the following categories: 3. Sites on the edge of the Main Settlements. 4. Sites on the edge of Village Service Centres and Larger Villages. 5. Strategic Allocations. Indeed, and until the evidence base has progressed further, and, in particular, until the drafts of Parts 3 and 4 of the Green Belt study are available, the Borough Council cannot be certain that a strategic Green Belt release is needed, or, if it is, how much development it needs to deliver within the local plan period. Accordingly, and at this stage, a holding objection has to be made in respect of all potential Green Belt releases. PART 2: HOUSING SITES - FAILURE TO INDENTIFY LAND AT ASHWELLS LODGE, BLACKMORE ROAD, DODDINHURST AS A HOUSING ALLOCATION. Object An objection is raised to Part 2 of the Preferred Site Allocations document, as it fails to identify Land at Ashwells Lodge, Blackmore Road, Doddinghurst (Site Ref: 188) as a potential housing allocation. Appendix 6, of the Site Selection Methodology and Summary of Outcomes: Working Draft (SSMSO:WD) document indicates that the site has been discounted because of its potential 'Green Belt impact'. The SSMSO:WD does not, however, quantify, for any site (whether a draft allocation or discounted site) potential impacts and it is, therefore, impossible to draw any conclusions as to the merits of any particular site and / or whether the Council's decision is 'sound'. Ashwells Lodge lies adjacent to the northeast boundary of Doddinghurst (see attached plan) and fronts Blackmore Road (opposite Dill Tree Farm and Dill Tree Health Centre). It comprises the main house, with outbuildings to the rear, and two small paddocks. It extends to some 1,85 ha and there are substantial tree and hedge lines to all boundaries. The settlement of Doddinghurst lies to the east, Dill Tree Farm and Dill Tree Health Centre lie to the north. A farm complex lies to the west, across a small field, with a copse bounding to the southwest. The site is visually contained by existing development and landscaping. The attached plan shows how the site could be developed to provide in the region of 32 residential units, at a density of 17.2 dwellings per hectare. Access would be taken via Blac The site does not occupy an isolated position in the Green Belt. Indeed, it fronts one of the main thoroughfares - Blackmore Road - in this part of the Borough, with there being bus stops, served by frequent services, some 50m to the east. This is a sustainable, accessible, site. Stage 3 - Sustainability Appraisal Appendix 3 of the Draft Local Plan Interim Sustainability Appraisal - January 2018 scores potential sites against a criteria based methodology in relation to 17 categories which are:- 1. AQMA. 2. SSSI. 3. Nature Reserve. 4. Ancient Woodland. 5. Local Wildlife Site. 6. Woodland. 7. GP Surgery. 8. Primary School. 9. Secondary School. 10. Conservation Area. 11. Scheduled Ancient Monument. 12. Registered Park or Garden of Historic Interest. 13. Listed Building. 14. Flood Zones 2 and 3. 15. Special Landscape Area. 16. Green Belt. 17. Agricultural Land. The sites are then put into 5 categories:- Dark Green - site performs particularly well. Light Green - site performs well. No shading - no issue in terms of the relevant criterion. Amber - site performs poorly. Red - site performs particularly poorly. As to be expected, every site (of the 300+ that were considered) performed poorly, or particularly poorly, in respect of one or more categories. The subject site is rated as having no impact upon a particular issue, or as performing well in 9 of the 17 categories (i.e. over 50%). It performs poorly in relation to 7 categories (SSSI, Ancient Woodland, Local Wildlife Site, Primary School, Listed Building, Green Belt and Agricultural Land) and only 'particularly poorly' in respect of 1 category (access to a Secondary School). The site performs as well as many other sites, including a number which have been identified in the Preferred Site Allocations document for Development. The Appraisal, as set out in the Draft Sustainability Appraisal, indicates that the site should move forward for detailed Stage 4 assessment. Stage 4 - Detailed Assessment The main criteria used in this stage of the assessment are described at paragraph 3.22 of the SSMSO:WD document. In this respect:- Flood Risk. The site lies within Flood Zone 1 and is not at risk of flooding. Green Belt. The site currently lies within the Green Belt and, therefore, it's development will lead to a loss of openness. However, the site is visually contained by existing development and landscape features and, therefore, the impact on the Green Belt outside of the site, itself, will be limited and can be mitigated through boundary landscaping. The Green Belt Study Working Draft (GBSWD) document includes the subject site within Parcel 41A. It assesses the contribution that each Parcel makes to the first four purposes of Green Belt which are:- 1. To check the unrestricted sprawl of large built up areas; 2. To prevent neighbouring towns merging into one another; 3. To assist in safeguarding the countryside from encroachment; and 4. To preserve the setting and special character of historic towns. In order to assess the contribution that each Parcel makes to Purpose 1, the GBSWD considers the 'containment' of the Parcel in terms of how well the land, or the features within it, contain existing settled areas and prevented urban sprawl. The Parcels are then put into three categories - 'Well-Contained', 'PartlyContained' and 'Not Contained' - with Parcel 41A falling within the middle, 'Partly-Contained', category. In terms of Purpose 2, the Parcels are put into four categories - 'Critical Countryside Gap', 'Import Countryside Gap', 'Minor Countryside Gap' and 'Non Critical Countryside Gap'. Parcel 41A falls in the highest category - 'Critical Country Gap'. Two categories were used in respect of Purpose 3 - these being 'Mixed Functions within Countryside' and 'Functional Countryside'. All Green Belt land to the north of A12, in the Borough, is defined as falling into the latter category. Finally, and in respect of Purpose 4, three categories were used - 'Limited Relationship with Historic Town', 'Moderate Relationship with Historic Town' and 'Strong Relationship with Historic Town'. Parcel 41A has a 'Limited Relationship with Historic Town'. Overall, Parcel 41A is deemed to make a moderate / high contribution to the first four Purposes of the Green Belt. This ranking is primarily due to the fact that the Parcel includes all that land between Doddinghurst and Kelvedon Hatch and thus helps to separate the two settlements (Purpose No. 2). The Green Belt Study Working Draft is, due to its very nature, a high level analysis dealing with large parcels of land and cannot take full account of the fact that, within each parcel, the contribution made by individual sites will vary. The main Purpose which the subject site serves is to restrict the extension of Doddinghurst to the east (Purpose 1). Whilst Parcel 41A (of which it forms a part) does maintain the gap between Doddinghurst and Kelvedon Hatch (Purpose 2), the loss of the subject site to the Green Belt, would not significantly harm that function. This is because the site forms a natural extension to Doddinghurst and is well-contained. Boundaries of the Green Belt in this location are ill-defined on the ground and there is large farmstead to the west. The site is well-contained, its development would create a logical, and defensible, boundary and its loss would not cause any significant diminution of the gap between the two settlements. Landscape: The site is not subject to any landscape designation and, being visually self-contained, it would not have a significant impact upon the character of the open countryside or surrounding area. Highways: The site lies in an accessible location on a major transport artery and bus route through this part of the Borough. Visibility, in both directions, from the access is good. There are pavement links (going east) into Doddinghurst and the speed limit, on this part of the road, is 30mph. Historic Assets: Dill Tree Farm, which lies opposite the site, is a listed building. The site could, however, be developed in a manner which causes no material harm to its setting. The are no registered parks or conservation areas in the vicinity. Ecology Designations: Church Wood, which lies adjacent to the southwest corner of the site, is designated as a County Wildlife Site. The nearest SSSI lies to the north of Kelvedon Hatch (The Coppice). Utilities: There are no known utility constraints in the Doddinghurst area. Education: The subject site has good access to Doddinghurst Church of England Junior School, with Secondary Schools being located in the main urban areas of Brentwood and Shenfield. Health Facilities: The site lies opposite the modern Dill Tree Health Centre. A detailed Site Assessment demonstrates that the site is suitable, available and deliverable for housing and should be allocated in the forthcoming Submission Draft Local Plan. See attached

Support

Preferred Site Allocations 2018

Representation ID: 19654

Received: 12/03/2018

Respondent: Chilmark Consulting Limited

Representation:

Supports sustainable growth and makes best use of brownfield and greenfield land. This represents a realistic approach to the need to release Green Belt land to fully support housing and economic delivery objectives of the Local Plan.

Full text:

This representation is made on behalf of our client, Barwood Land and Estates Ltd.
Barwood Land and Estates (BLEL) support the proposed allocation of Land at Honeypot Lane, Brentwood (reference 022) as a Brentwood Urban Area, A12 Corridor Urban Extension as set out at page 77 of the Local Plan. The proposed allocation follows the settlement hierarchy and proposed spatial distribution of housing set out in other plan policies and objectives. BLEL support the proposed housing allocation of Land at Honeypot Lane but raise a number of more specific comments as follows: BLEL consider that Land at Honeypot Lane has an indicative development capacity for >200 dwellings based on masterplanning and detailed site analysis/testing undertaken to date by BLEL and shared with the Borough Council. The proposed allocation information should therefore be updated accordingly for up to 250 dwellings total. The next iteration of the Local Plan Sustainability Appraisal should also take this quantum into account. BLEL note that the Honeypot Lane site is also identified as a potential location for a C2 Use Class care home and query where this indicative land use proposal originates as it has not been proposed to the Borough Council or discussed with BLEL as the development promoter to date. The reference to C2 Care Home appears to refer to paragraph 9.2.5 of the Interim Sustainability Appraisal Report that notes that there is a potential for some 40 bed space C2 Use Class provision for the site and itself purports to draw this from the latest version of the Borough's Strategic Housing Market Assessment. Land at Honeypot Lane is described as a 'self-contained urban extension' but clearly the development would be integrated with Brentwood and particularly with surrounding areas including St Faiths Country Park. Indeed, the site's location supports the potential for a high degree of integration rather than self-containment. BLEL suggest that the wording of the Local Plan text be modified accordingly in this respect. With respect to housing delivery, BLEL consider that Land at Honeypot Lane is capable of delivery within the five year period rather than in the longer 5-10 year period. The site is suitable, available and achievable and has a willing landowner, developer and investor. The potential for early delivery in the plan period has been discussed with the Borough Council and BLEL suggest that the Local Plan text be updated to reflect the ability to bring this site forward early in the plan period. Barwood Land and Estates support the Spatial Strategy shown in Figure 5 (page 17). The Spatial Strategy shows a realistic overall distribution of growth. It focuses on sustainable urban locations and the best opportunities for Green Belt release in/adjacent to existing higher order settlements in order to meet identified housing and economic growth objectives of the Local Plan. Barwood Land and Estates (BLEL) support the proposed Housing-led Allocation set out in Figure 9 (pages 26 - 27). In particular, BLEL supports the proposed allocation of Land at Honeypot Lane, Brentwood (reference no. 022) as a housing site allocation. Land at Honeypot Lane is a sustainable location and a deliverable housing site within the urban area of Brentwood. The site can come forward early in the Plan period without the need for extensive new infrastructure. Release of the site from the Green Belt will ensure development can be achieved in a timely manner and that this site can contribute to supplying much needed new housing in Brentwood. BLEL has undertaken an extensive and detailed technical and design analysis of the Honeypot Lane site and has concluded that the site is capable of delivering more than 200 dwellings without causing adverse effects on highways, landscape, amenity or other matters. BLEL has previously shared this analysis with the Borough Council. On this basis BLEL consider that the site is capable of sustainably accommodating up to 250 dwellings and the Local Plan should be updated accordingly at Figure 9 (and elsewhere where the Plan identifies a proposed allocation quantum for the site) to reflect this. Barwood Land and Estates (BLEL) support the proposed Settlement Hierarchy set out in Figure 14 (page 35). In particular, BLEL supports the proposed allocation of Land at Honeypot Lane, Brentwood (reference no. 022) as a housing site allocation. The proposed settlement hierarchy represents the current pattern of activity and forms a realistic approach to guiding future sustainable development patterns of activity and land use in the Borough. The hierarchy clearly and appropriately identifies Brentwood, Shenfield, Hutton, Warley, Brook Street and Pilgrims Hatch as 'Category 1 - Main Towns'. Barwood Land and Estates (BLEL) has reviewed the Interim Sustainability Appraisal Report (SA)
that supports the Local Plan Site Allocations and has the following comments with respect to paragraphs 10.5.4 (page 44); 10.10.2 (page 52); and the Site Appraisal of BLEL's site and Honeypot Lane, Brentwood (022) on page 81. Paragraph 10.5.4 (page 44) BLEL note that the Honeypot Lane site is proposed for a reduced level of housing (200 dwellings compared to 250 dwellings) when comparing the current Site Allocations Plan with the previous 2016 draft Local Plan. BLEL are not aware of any site specific reason why there should be a reduction and have considers (based on extensive technical assessments and site masterplanning that the site should be allocated for up to 250 dwellings. The SA should therefore be updated and revised accordingly in this respect. BLEL agree with the SA at 10.5.4 that the Land at Honeypot Lane site is associated with an opportunity to support enhanced pedestrian links through St Faiths Country Park. The SA notes at 10.5.4 that the potential for noise and potentially air pollution on the Honeypot Lane site arising from the A12 road. BLEL considers that the site's design and specific technical measures respond to the context of the site, including proximity to the A12 road and that the emerging scheme design includes appropriate buffers and mitigations for noise and air pollution amenity accordingly. The SA text should therefore be updated accordingly in this respect. A small watercourse running through the Honeypot Lane site is noted in the SA at 10.5.4 and the text highlights this as an example of the factors that will need to be taken into account in developing the site. BLEL has undertaken extensive technical analysis including physical surveys and assessments of the site and can confirm that site and surrounding area physical characteristics have been taken fully into account in concluding that the site can deliver up to 250 dwellings. Paragraph 10.10.2 (page 52) Paragraph 10.10.2 of the SA Interim Report identifies a lower level of housing delivery at Land at Honeypot Lane (and other Green Belt sites in Brentwood) as potentially having a lower landscape effect than earlier proposals and also potential for more green space on the site. BLEL's conclusion, following extensive technical analysis including landscape and visual impact assessment work is that Land at Honeypot Lane can deliver more than the 200 dwellings set out in the Site Allocations Plan and it can do so without adverse landscape effects. The site can achieve this while supporting levels of new amenity and green infrastructure to high degree. Honeypot Lane can therefore deliver more housing than the current version of the Plan identifies and can do so without adverse landscape effects given sensitive site design and the effective use of the site's natural topography and natural boundary vegetation as appropriate. Honeypot Lane Site Appraisal (page 81) BLEL note that the SA Interim Report has provided a high level sustainability appraisal of the Honeypot Lane site (page 81). BLEL concur with the analysis and note that the Site performs well in relation the analytical criterion. BLEL notes that the SA site assessment criteria covering issues such as access to primary and secondary schools and GP's surgeries is based on existing local provision and does not consider the potential future provision arising from new development as the Local Plan is implemented. I.e. the SA site assessment does not consider the potential for an enhanced level of site sustainability where development has supported the provision of new or expanded facilities. It is also important, in BLEL's view that that the SA site assessments consider factors such as the quality or capacity of facilities and services as well as a site's distance from such facilities. Quality and capacity are equally important sustainability factors. The Red Amber Green (RAG) scoring system used for the SA's site sustainability appraisals has no green scores in relation to a number of criteria. For example, Air Quality Management Areas and proximity to SSSI designations. This means that all sites are either scored red or amber for such criteria. Similarly, the distance from a Local Nature Reserve criteria is scored as either Red or Green (there is no amber). The RAG scoring system is, in BLEL's view, helpful but rather confusing overall as it mixes two and three RAG scoring codes depending on the criterion in question. BLEL is of the view that the assessment criteria and RAG scoring should be used consistently in respect of each criteria in the next version of the Sustainability Appraisal of the Local Plan. Barwood Land and Estates (BLEL) support the Local Plan at paragraph 43 (page 19) concerning objectively assessed housing need. BLEL support the higher OAN figure (380 dpa) calculated in the latest version of the Strategic Housing Market Assessment, but consider it is realistic and appropriate to now plan on basis of the Government's standardised methodology as set out in the new consultation draft NPPF and in revisions to the NPPG. It is clear that Government intends to adopt the standardised methodology in future and the Local Plan should reflect this now. Therefore, the Plan should set out opportunities and sites to deliver the 454 dpa (+74 dpa over the OAN). This supports and emphasises the need for a choice and mix of sites to ensure delivery and focuses the Plan into ensuring release of sufficient brownfield land and Green Belt sites at sustainable locations in order to deliver. Barwood Land and Estates (BLEL) support paragraph 54 (page 22) of the Local Plan that is concerned with the supply of housing sites. BLEL agree that it is appropriate to review, test and evaluate (and discount where necessary) a wide range of housing sites through the HELAA process. The process undertaken has been thorough in identifying potential sites and in evidencing those selected for allocation in the Plan. The Vision (page 11) supports sustainable growth and makes best use of brownfield and greenfield
land. This represents a realistic approach to the need to release Green Belt land to fully support housing and economic delivery objectives of the Local Plan.

Comment

Preferred Site Allocations 2018

Representation ID: 19835

Received: 12/03/2018

Respondent: AECOM

Representation:

Deliverability of the Draft Plan - the stated delivery rates for Dunton Hills Garden
Village are overly ambitious, especially if there were to be an over reliance on one
developer. BBC should ensure the next iteration of the plan keeps the allocation
flexible and open to delivery on the eastern side of site 200.

Full text:

See attached.

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