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Object

Draft Local Plan

Chapter 3. Vision

Representation ID: 13155

Received: 24/02/2016

Respondent: Woodland Trust

Representation Summary:

Mention the importance of trees and woodlands in the vision.
[An important publication from the Forestry Commission, The Case for Trees in development and the urban environment, lists the benefits as -
Climate change contributions
Environment advantages
Economic dividends
Social benefits.]

Full text:

We would like to see mention of trees and woods in your vision.

The Governments Big Tree Plant website states that:
'Trees can make a street come to life, by attracting wildlife, changing colours throughout the seasons, and creating shade and shelter. They shield houses from traffic noise, can help save energy, and reduce the risk of flooding.' The website goes on to say 'There is evidence that trees in cities can also help fight the effects of air pollution and climate change.'

An important publication from the Forestry Commission, The Case for Trees in development and the urban environment (Forestry Commission, July 2010), sets out 'The multiple value of trees for people and places - increasing greenspace and tree numbers is likely to remain one of the most effective tools for making urban areas more convivial', and lists (on p.10) the benefits as -

Climate change contributions
Environment advantages
Economic dividends
Social benefits.

Object

Draft Local Plan

Policy 9.1: Historic and Natural Environment Landscape Character

Representation ID: 13157

Received: 24/02/2016

Respondent: Woodland Trust

Representation Summary:

Ancient woodland should be protected and buffered from development.
[With only 2.4% of the land area in Great Britain covered by ancient woodland, it is essential that no more of this finite resource is lost. This means that ancient woodland must be protected absolutely from permanent clearance, but also that it must be protected from damaging effects of adjacent and nearby land-use that could threaten the integrity of the habitat and survival of its special characteristics.]

Full text:

We would wish to see ancient woodland given full protection in this plan.

Ancient woods are irreplaceable. They are our richest terrestrial wildlife habitats, with complex ecological communities that have developed over centuries, and contain a high proportion of rare and threatened species, many of which are dependent on the particular conditions that this habitat affords. For this reason, ancient woods are reservoirs of biodiversity, but because the resource is limited and highly fragmented, they and their associated wildlife are particularly vulnerable.

Their long continuity and lack of disturbance means ancient woods are often also living history books, preserving archaeological features and evidence of past land use, from earthworks to charcoal pits. They are also places of great aesthetic appeal, making them attractive for recreation and the many benefits this can bring in terms of health and well being.

With only 2.4% of the land area in Great Britain covered by ancient woodland, it is essential that no more of this finite resource is lost. This means that ancient woodland must be protected absolutely from permanent clearance, but also that it must be protected from damaging effects of adjacent and nearby land-use that could threaten the integrity of the habitat and survival of its special characteristics.

It is not possible to replace ancient woodland by planting a new site, or attempting translocation. Every ancient wood is a unique habitat that has evolved over centuries, with a complex interdependency of geology, soils, hydrology, flora and fauna.

For this reason the Trust believes ancient woodland must be given absolute protection under this plan.

Object

Draft Local Plan

Figure 9.1: Environment and Biodiversity

Representation ID: 13159

Received: 24/02/2016

Respondent: Woodland Trust

Representation Summary:

All ancient woodland should be protected from development.
[All ancient woodland should be on this map. With only 2.4% of the land area in Great Britain covered by ancient woodland, it is essential that no more of this finite resource is lost. This means that ancient woodland must be protected absolutely from permanent clearance, but also that it must be protected from damaging effects of adjacent and nearby land-use that could threaten the integrity of the habitat and survival of its special characteristics.]

Full text:

All ancient woodland should be on this map.

Ancient woods are irreplaceable. They are our richest terrestrial wildlife habitats, with complex ecological communities that have developed over centuries, and contain a high proportion of rare and threatened species, many of which are dependent on the particular conditions that this habitat affords. For this reason, ancient woods are reservoirs of biodiversity, but because the resource is limited and highly fragmented, they and their associated wildlife are particularly vulnerable.

Their long continuity and lack of disturbance means ancient woods are often also living history books, preserving archaeological features and evidence of past land use, from earthworks to charcoal pits. They are also places of great aesthetic appeal, making them attractive for recreation and the many benefits this can bring in terms of health and well being.

With only 2.4% of the land area in Great Britain covered by ancient woodland, it is essential that no more of this finite resource is lost. This means that ancient woodland must be protected absolutely from permanent clearance, but also that it must be protected from damaging effects of adjacent and nearby land-use that could threaten the integrity of the habitat and survival of its special characteristics.

It is not possible to replace ancient woodland by planting a new site, or attempting translocation. Every ancient wood is a unique habitat that has evolved over centuries, with a complex interdependency of geology, soils, hydrology, flora and fauna.

Comment

Draft Local Plan

Policy 9.3: Landscape Protection and Woodland Management

Representation ID: 13160

Received: 24/02/2016

Respondent: Woodland Trust

Representation Summary:

Ancient woodland should be protected from development. Amend wording to add that native trees should be planted.
[Where feasible, proposals should promote the use of NATIVE trees, hedges, wildlife gardens, allotments, ponds, green roofs/walls, roosting boxes and wider habitat creation.]

Full text:

We support the following:

Development will not be permitted where it would have a detrimental effect on, or result in the loss of, significant landscape heritage or a feature of ecological importance, including trees, woodlands or hedgerows.

Where feasible, proposals should promote the use of trees, hedges, wildlife gardens, allotments, ponds, green roofs/walls, roosting boxes and wider habitat creation.

We would suggest adding the word native in the sentence above, to read:

Where feasible, proposals should promote the use of NATIVE trees, hedges, wildlife gardens, allotments, ponds, green roofs/walls, roosting boxes and wider habitat creation.

We would wish to see ancient woodland protected from development in this plan.

We would suggest planting a range of native trees to ensure greater resilience to threats such as tree disease.

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